10 must-read posts about our autonomous world

Lori Castle
New York 40° 42' 52.38" N, -74° 0' 25.632" E

Technology changes remarkably fast now, and though innovation may seem sudden, hindsight underscores the many disruptors and countless iterations that precede a revolution. One day we'll wake up, be in a fully autonomous world -- one with new types of transport, new cityscapes, new rules and new services -- and wonder how we got there. These 10 posts, while currently prophetic, will soon be historic, so keep up and read them now.

Creating a digital representation of reality

We are taking the driving experience from hands-on to hands-off. Tomorrow, maps will morph into something else entirely -- when everything physical will become digital. We are no longer a map company, but a data company; one that is preparing for a world of increasingly autonomous machines.

Building the location layer for an autonomous world with HERE Developer Relations

Data is the new oil -- an invaluable resource waiting to be tapped, and the developer is key to unlocking this commodity.

The Moral Machine tests the ethics behind self-driving cars

Human drivers make judgement calls on a daily basis, and in the same scenarios autonomous cars will need to react, too. That means programming machines to pick the best possible outcome, but what happens when it comes down to an ethical choice? In a bid to understand the way machines will need to respond and to help gather a human perspective, a team at MIT have developed the Moral Machine.

The coming of age for artificial intelligence

While artificial intelligence (AI) has been central to sci-fi films for more than 50 years, it has not lived up to the hype in the real world. But now, with unprecedented interest and investment, AI is coming of age.

What would a city built for autonomous cars look like?

Autonomous cars will change the way we get around in the coming years and decades, and they’re also set to change our cities and environments. Find out how our habitats are likely to evolve in the future.

The difference between autonomous and driverless cars

Automated, self-driving, autonomous and driverless -- there are many different terms for vehicles that can drive themselves and, perhaps surprisingly, they don’t all mean the same thing.

Will we ever see the flying car?

As excitement continues to build over the future of autonomous vehicles, the concept of the flying car has become almost antiquated -- a pop culture-infused joke restricted to references to The Jetsons or, for those with more discerning taste, The Fifth Element. Yet, thanks to some deeply ambitious companies, this fantastical idea may finally have lift off.

A brief pop culture history of artificial intelligence

The roots of artificial intelligence (A.I.) in pop culture run deep. The idea of manmade intelligence has been used in films, television and books to illicit fear, laughter and even, on occasion, lust (we’re looking at you, Weird Science). As A.I. plays a more prominent part in our everyday lives, we thought we’d take a look at some of the more famous instances of artificial intelligence in popular culture, and see just how close fantasy hems to reality.

Can pedestrians rule the roads?

Along with winning the trust of the public, autonomous vehicles also need to integrate into cities, which leads us to theorize about how pedestrians and autonomous vehicles will interact with each other in the future. Could we see cities and the roads ruled by pedestrians? We spoke to Adam Millard-Ball, assistant professor at the University of California, a transport planner and economist, to find out more.

Dubai, not Detroit, first city to get Robocop

Robotics are playing an increasingly prominent part of our lives. Their growing ubiquity has meant that we now see robots undertaking tasks from delivering items, to cleaning floors. Now, one of the most important roles in society may be being placed in the shiny hands of a robot. Get ready to say hello to a real-life Robocop.

Topics: Autonomous cars, Autonomous World, Developers, Features, Open Location Platform, Editor's picks

Comments